Skip to Content

How to Make Teacup Candles

Today we are talking about how to make teacup candles using a sweet vintage antique tea cup. This cheap and easy project can be created with an old candle or wax pellets.

How to make a teacup candle

Before I begin talking about how to make teacup candles let me share that this is my first time candle making and it was so easy. I ask myself why did I wait this long to make a candle in any kind of jar.

I love making candles out of fruit like this how to make a candle from an orange and how to make a candle from an apple. These candles are super easy because you don't have to melt the wax. But I have never made a candle in a jar — meaning melting wax and all the steps.

But what really got me interested in making a candle was after I did some research on what to look for in clean burning candles. That was when I became interested in making my own candles.

You are probably wondering why am I teaching how to make a teacup candle rather than another type of container candle? Well, I have several late 1800's pretty teacups that belonged to my husband's mom. They never get used so I thought wouldn't it be pretty to make them into a candle.

Well, now that you know what made this all come about, let's get started on our DIY project by grabbing supplies.

This post contains affiliate links, which means I receive a commission if you make a purchase using the links below. All opinions are all my own.

How to Make a Teacup Candle

Most of the supplies you will need you may already have at home. Except maybe the teacup. You can find vintage teacups at your local thrift store, charity shops, or second-hand stores. There are many places to find pretty tea cups!

Now collect all your supplies first before you get started melting the wax for your DIY candle.

Shop Supplies:

How to Make a Candle in a Tea Cup

Candle making only requires a few easy steps. Basically, to make a candle all you have to do is melt wax and pour it into the jar or, in our case a pretty teacup, that already has a wick inside. Let's begin with the first step, and that is planning out what to melt the wax in.

How to Melt Wax for Candle

Before you start, make sure your glass bowl sits down inside your pot but does not touch the bottom, similar to a double boiler. Once you have this part figured out, add water to the pot about 1/4 of the inside of the pot. Turn the burner on and wait for it to come to a low rolling boil.

While you are waiting for the water to boil, it's a good idea to get the wax ready. Let's break the taper candles into three smaller candles. I used both my hands, grabbed the candle in each hand and snapped it. Once you have a break you will need to cut the wick inside with scissors.

Using an old beeswax candle to melt to make a teacup candle

Now check on the water and if it is boiling bring the burner down to close to low where the water comes to a low rolling boil. Then go ahead and sit the bowl into the pot and place broken candles inside. I only put three pieces of a candle in at a time because my pot is small. Stir the wax pieces with a popsicle stick around until they melt.

Melting a beeswax candle

If your water acts like it wants to come out of the pot around the glass bowl simply turn it down until it stops.

As the wax melts you will notice that the wicks come loose. Simply take the jumbo popsicle stick and lift it out of the bowl onto the plate.

Removing the wick from the beeswax candle

Now add three more pieces of wax and stir them until they are melted.

Once the wax has melted, turn off the burner. The wax will stay in liquid form because of the warm water.

Next, place your cutting board close by and set the teacup on it. I placed my cutting board on the other side of my range. It is convenient to have it close by, but you can put it on the counter too.


How to Set Up a Wick for a Candle

Now determine how long your candle wick needs to be and cut the wick. I measured from up against the cup and then cut the wick about 1/4″ shorter than the mark. You want your wick to be 1/8″ above the wax once you pour it inside.

how to measure the wick for a candle

Then place the wooden wick into the metal frame wick holder. Next, use your hot glue gun to add a dab of hot glue to the bottom of the metal frame. Then place it inside on the bottom of your teacup in the center of the cup.

Setting a wooden wick in the bottom of a teacup with hot glue

If you are using a cotton candle wicks, repeat these steps except cut the wick an extra couple of inches. Once you place the wick into the bottom of the cup, take a wooden skewer or pencil and wrap the wick around it. This will keep your wick straight.

How to Pour Candle Wax into Cup

Now pick up the bowl with a hot pad or oven mitt and pour the melted wax into the teacup. This is where the spout comes in handy. It helps keep the wax from going where it shouldn't. Pour the wax until it is about 1/8″ below the top of the wooden wick. Go slowly, you do not want to pour too much wax.

Pouring beeswax into a teacup to make a candle

Next, let it sit, and the wax cool for at least four hours. Do not touch, bump or move the teacup candle. If it is moved in any way, even if it looks like it is solid, it may cave into the middle a little. I know because I learned the hard way. Here is how it looks after 10 minutes.

Beeswax teacup candle drying after 10 minutes

Here is how it looks after 4 hours.

Making a vintage teacup candle

Once your teacup candle is hardened you are all finished. If your wick is still too long and needs trimming, simply use scissors and trim it down to 1/8″ above the wax.

When you go to light it, make sure to burn it for a while the first time so the wax melts out to the edges. This will help the candle to burn more evenly in the future.

How to Decorate with a Teacup Candle

The best part is deciding where to display your tea cup candles. Here are some ideas on how to decorate with your teacup candle. It looks amazing on an end table. Our sitting room off the kitchen is the perfect spot for tea so this teacup candle looks perfect nestled with these accessories.

Candle in a teacup DIY

Your teacup candle also looks great on a coffee table. Our coffee table is a great place to burn it because it is not near anything that can catch on fire.

Decorating with a teacup candle

These sweet little teacup candles make great gifts. You can give it for Valentine's day or use it as a place setting for a special dinner, Mother's Day, or bridal shower. Then you can give it as a gift to all your guests to take home. Can you imagine how special they will feel going home with the wonderful gift of an antique vintage teacup candle?

How to make a candle in a teacup for a gift

There are so many beautiful ways you can style your teacup candle.

Conclusion

You are probably wondering why I used two taper beeswax candles instead of buying beeswax pellets. Well, I was so excited to get started and the only natural beeswax I could find were these candles. I like to use clean-burning candles in my home so that is why I was looking specifically for beeswax.

You can also do this project with Dollar Tree taper candles unless you are looking for organic or natural wax. This teacup candle would be super cheap if you already have the teacup and use Dollar Tree candles.

It's also a fun to make teacup candles with different scents. You may also try using soy candles or soy wax flakes that you can find at your craft store. It's even a great way to give new life to old candles. Keep in mind that a different type of wax may have a lower melting point so keep a close eye on your melting wax.

I hope you have found these DIY teacup candles inspiring. Do you have an old teacup sitting around? DIY candles are a simple craft a try. There are so many fun ways to use your teacup candle. Whether you keep it for yourself or use it as a wonderful gift, it will give your old teacup a new purpose.

Happy Decorating!

If you enjoyed this post, sign up to receive new decor ideas each week. FREE EMAIL SUBSCRIPTION

[mv_create key=”65″ type=”diy” title=”How to Make Teacup Candles” thumbnail=”https://lifeonsummerhill.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/02/making-a-beeswax-candle.png”]